Some Updates on EdTech

People can argue back and forth over whether or not it’s a good thing, but companies are partnering with schools to essentially create certified employees. Take a look.

Now, however, employers are raising their stakes with courses designed to bolster the pipeline of new workers for their product or technology, specifically. Google, for example, is working with more than two dozen community colleges to offer credit for a five-course, online IT certification. It’s among several other companies, mostly in tech, doing so.

“Many of the employers who are doing credentialing are looking to have their credentials be part of pathways in education,” Jonathan Finkelstein, founder and CEO of digital credentialing platform Credly, told Education Dive. “Virtually every major tech company is thinking, ‘How do we reach people earlier in their career pathways so the credentials they offer become preparation for jobs?'”

We can debate the value of this, but there’s no debating its prominence if Google et al. are already on the path.

A word on Artificial Intelligence.

Where the technologies are being used for learning they are fundamentally changing the nature of instruction. Panelists discussed applications such as smart lecture-capture technology that gives students searchable video transcripts of lectures to study as well as simulated training in classroom interventions for aspiring teachers and virtual reality environments in which medical students can practice procedures.

As an outsider, that sounds cool and efficient. With any of this, I worry it will just increase inequity. We are rapidly reaching a point where all of this can be done. My question as always is how we can ensure that this development lifts the vulnerable instead of leaving them behind. But I don’t really know enough about the technology to say much more than that. Yet.