Of Course They Did

Just read.

  • The Trump administration is planning to rescind Obama-era 2011 and 2016 guidance documents encouraging the use of race in college admissions to promote diversity on campus, the Wall Street Journal is reporting.

 

It’s really just because it was done by the previous administration. But truthfully, it doesn’t really matter that much, because:

However, studies show that even with affirmative action guidelines, black and Hispanic students are less represented on campuses than they were 35 years ago, so the policies have not been effectual spurs of change in access. Even if race were to be dropped from admissions forms to create more holistic admissions considerations, factors like zip code still give identifying information that could be used to determine one’s likely racial, ethnic or socioeconomic status.

Additionally, leaders still have to look internally at their practices and the barriers, known and unknown, they may be creating for students of color. Standardized tests, like the SAT/ACT, not only come with a known cultural bias, they can also be an additional cost barrier to entry for low-income students. And while many leaders will acknowledge the climate in higher education as a whole is hostile, few are introspective enough to recognize their campus climates may not be as welcoming to students of color as they should be.

These stories make the headlines, but the actual day-to-day life of a student of color who aspires to, or is already in, college is where our focus should be.